sbkst.konzolR 0.1.0

C# Console Utility Microlibrary
Boost your C# Console Applications with a few simple extensions and components.
For more information check out the project site!

Install-Package sbkst.konzolR -Version 0.1.0
dotnet add package sbkst.konzolR --version 0.1.0
<PackageReference Include="sbkst.konzolR" Version="0.1.0" />
For projects that support PackageReference, copy this XML node into the project file to reference the package.
paket add sbkst.konzolR --version 0.1.0
The NuGet Team does not provide support for this client. Please contact its maintainers for support.
#r "nuget: sbkst.konzolR, 0.1.0"
For F# scripts that support #r syntax, copy this into the source code to reference the package.

konzolR

C# Console Utility Microlibrary

Packagist
NuGet

About

konzolR is a Micro Library for C# Console Applications

Why

The why is easy, I've a -lot- of custom written Build Tools in my tool chain to support me in my daily business. Those are all console applications which are embedded in the pre- and post-Build Proccess. One thing that bugged me while maintaining those where those tedious generic things I almost always need in those tools and I used to do over and over again. Altough those arent hard tasks and mostly not library worthy they bugged me so much that I created this (micro-)library 🔧

🗃 Whats in the box

⚙ (simple) Argument Binder

The Argument Binder is designed to be verbose, I literally want to know whats going on when looking at the source. We all know or have seen horrible constructs for handling the passed arguments - not that we wrote any of those 😸 - and you mostly loose it after the second if/switch block.

So show me a example already!

So we want to bind our a args against

class InputArgs
    {
        public Boolean Force { get; set; }
        public Boolean OutputToFileSupplied { get; set; }
        public string FilePath { get; set; }
        public Boolean UsersSupplied { get; set; }
        public string[] UserNames { get; set; }
        public Boolean HexSupplied { get; set; }
        public string Hex { get; set; }
    }

with this

static void Main(string[] args)
        {
//create a new argument binder to bind it to InputArgs
var setup = ArgumentBinder.Create<InputArgs>();
//Setup the arguments we want to bind
var binder = setup
         .CreateFor("-f", "Forces creation", field => field.Force)
         .CreatePathArgumentFor("-out", "Sets outputfile dir", c => c.OutputToFileSupplied, c => c.FilePath)
         .CreateArgumentWithPayloadFor("-addr", "Sets Hex-Address", c => c.HexSupplied, c => c.Hex, new Regex("[^[0-9A-F]+$]"))
         .CreateArrayArgumentFor("-users", "List of users", c => c.UsersSupplied, c => c.UserNames)
         .Build();
try
{
    //bind it
    var input = binder.Bind(args);
    //do something with the input like
    if (input.Force) Console.WriteLine("Forced");
}
catch (ArgumentBinderException e) //check for binding errors
{
    Console.WriteLine("Please check the supplied arguments.");
    //dispay details whats wrong
    e.BindingErrors.ToList().ForEach(err =>
    {
        Console.WriteLine(err);
    });
    //display help text
    binder.Help();
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Uh-Oh something went horrible wrong here.");
    Console.WriteLine("Error occured: {0}", ex.Message);
}
        }

So whats going on is, the binder is beeing setup with commands and then tries to bind the those to the supplied type. It does check the conditions for the argument-types supplied but wont allow you to define certain chains that need to be supplied.The binder itself is stupid its job is to automap the supplied args to the POCO, after that we still would have to validate the supplied arguments. While this seems pointless it is not; at least for me. It adds verbosity and readability to the the argument part - if you dont like it; dont use it.

For a more comprehensive overview check the Documentation-Section

⚙ (simple) Dialog

This is a helper for basic console dialogs (dialog as in q&a - not visually like in curses). Its main purpose is to simplify first-time and one-time setups. The result of the dialog will be bound to a poco again for later processing.

Lets have a look at some code.

We are binding to:

    public class TestInput
    {
        public string SomeString { get; set; }
        public bool SomeBool { get; set; }
        public int SomeInt { get; set; }
        public decimal SomeDecimal { get; set; }
        public decimal? OptionalDecimal { get; set; }
        public string FilteredString { get; set; }
    }

The dialog itself

var dialog = DialogHelper.Create<TestInput>("Hello, I am the test dialog, I will help you set things up");
dialog.Ask(c => c.SomeString, "Whats some string?");
dialog.Ask(c => c.SomeBool, "Whats some bool?");
dialog.Ask(c => c.SomeDecimal, "Whats some decimal?");
dialog.Ask(c => c.SomeInt, "Whats some int?");
dialog.AskOptional(c => c.OptionalDecimal, "You might want to add another decimal?");
dialog.AskOptional(c => c.FilteredString, "This is a skipable filtered string!", new Regex("[a-b]"));
dialog.Ask(c => c.FilteredString, "Now you cant skip this filtered string!", new Regex("[a-b]"));
TestInput data = dialog.Run();

This will start a line-by-line dialog asking the user the questions specified. As you may have noticed there are mandatory questions with .Ask and optional with .AskOptional, where AskOptional accepts nullable types. For more information refer to the Documentation-Section

⚙ (simple) Loading Bar (& Waiting Bar)

Displays a classic progress bar, the loading bar takes a percentage value which it will be drawn to, while the waiting bar will just keep filling itself up till its stopped. This goes
well with the title screen and preloading ressources or checking stati before running the application.

A loading bar example

using (var bar = Loading.LoadingHelper.GetLoadingBar())
{
    for (short i = 0; i <= 100; i++)
    {
        bar.SetPercentage(i);
        //or perform a actually usefull task
        System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(50);
    }
    bar.Done();
}

A waiting bar example

using (var bar = Loading.LoadingHelper.GetWaitingBar())
{
    bar.Start();
    TimeConsumingStuff();
    bar.Done();
}

⚙ (simple) Title Screen

The title screen simply will center a supplied application name in a ascii box. Messages below the box can be supplied and it can be paired with a loading or waiting bar.

using (var title = TitleHelper.CreateTitlescreenFor("Superawsome Application!"))
{
    title.Show();
    Console.ReadKey();
    title.ChangeText("Pretty cool eh? Want to see a loading bar too? Press enter");
    Console.ReadKey();
    title.ChangeText("Here we go");
    using (var bar = Loading.LoadingHelper.GetLoadingBar())
    {
        bar.Start();
        title.ChangeText("Doing some important stuff");
        bar.SetPercentage(25);
        System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(50);
        title.ChangeText("Almost there ...");
        bar.SetPercentage(50);
        System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(500);
        bar.SetPercentage(80);
        title.ChangeText("Finishing up...");
        System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(800);
        bar.SetPercentage(100);
        title.ChangeText("...and we are ready to go!");
    }
    Console.ReadKey();
    title.Close();

}

⚙ Console Extensions

It also ships with a handfull of convenience utility functions, please refer to the documentation section below

Documentation

https://github.com/eisenwinter/konzolR/blob/master/README.md#-documentation

konzolR

C# Console Utility Microlibrary

Packagist
NuGet

About

konzolR is a Micro Library for C# Console Applications

Why

The why is easy, I've a -lot- of custom written Build Tools in my tool chain to support me in my daily business. Those are all console applications which are embedded in the pre- and post-Build Proccess. One thing that bugged me while maintaining those where those tedious generic things I almost always need in those tools and I used to do over and over again. Altough those arent hard tasks and mostly not library worthy they bugged me so much that I created this (micro-)library 🔧

🗃 Whats in the box

⚙ (simple) Argument Binder

The Argument Binder is designed to be verbose, I literally want to know whats going on when looking at the source. We all know or have seen horrible constructs for handling the passed arguments - not that we wrote any of those 😸 - and you mostly loose it after the second if/switch block.

So show me a example already!

So we want to bind our a args against

class InputArgs
    {
        public Boolean Force { get; set; }
        public Boolean OutputToFileSupplied { get; set; }
        public string FilePath { get; set; }
        public Boolean UsersSupplied { get; set; }
        public string[] UserNames { get; set; }
        public Boolean HexSupplied { get; set; }
        public string Hex { get; set; }
    }

with this

static void Main(string[] args)
        {
//create a new argument binder to bind it to InputArgs
var setup = ArgumentBinder.Create<InputArgs>();
//Setup the arguments we want to bind
var binder = setup
         .CreateFor("-f", "Forces creation", field => field.Force)
         .CreatePathArgumentFor("-out", "Sets outputfile dir", c => c.OutputToFileSupplied, c => c.FilePath)
         .CreateArgumentWithPayloadFor("-addr", "Sets Hex-Address", c => c.HexSupplied, c => c.Hex, new Regex("[^[0-9A-F]+$]"))
         .CreateArrayArgumentFor("-users", "List of users", c => c.UsersSupplied, c => c.UserNames)
         .Build();
try
{
    //bind it
    var input = binder.Bind(args);
    //do something with the input like
    if (input.Force) Console.WriteLine("Forced");
}
catch (ArgumentBinderException e) //check for binding errors
{
    Console.WriteLine("Please check the supplied arguments.");
    //dispay details whats wrong
    e.BindingErrors.ToList().ForEach(err =>
    {
        Console.WriteLine(err);
    });
    //display help text
    binder.Help();
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Uh-Oh something went horrible wrong here.");
    Console.WriteLine("Error occured: {0}", ex.Message);
}
        }

So whats going on is, the binder is beeing setup with commands and then tries to bind the those to the supplied type. It does check the conditions for the argument-types supplied but wont allow you to define certain chains that need to be supplied.The binder itself is stupid its job is to automap the supplied args to the POCO, after that we still would have to validate the supplied arguments. While this seems pointless it is not; at least for me. It adds verbosity and readability to the the argument part - if you dont like it; dont use it.

For a more comprehensive overview check the Documentation-Section

⚙ (simple) Dialog

This is a helper for basic console dialogs (dialog as in q&a - not visually like in curses). Its main purpose is to simplify first-time and one-time setups. The result of the dialog will be bound to a poco again for later processing.

Lets have a look at some code.

We are binding to:

    public class TestInput
    {
        public string SomeString { get; set; }
        public bool SomeBool { get; set; }
        public int SomeInt { get; set; }
        public decimal SomeDecimal { get; set; }
        public decimal? OptionalDecimal { get; set; }
        public string FilteredString { get; set; }
    }

The dialog itself

var dialog = DialogHelper.Create<TestInput>("Hello, I am the test dialog, I will help you set things up");
dialog.Ask(c => c.SomeString, "Whats some string?");
dialog.Ask(c => c.SomeBool, "Whats some bool?");
dialog.Ask(c => c.SomeDecimal, "Whats some decimal?");
dialog.Ask(c => c.SomeInt, "Whats some int?");
dialog.AskOptional(c => c.OptionalDecimal, "You might want to add another decimal?");
dialog.AskOptional(c => c.FilteredString, "This is a skipable filtered string!", new Regex("[a-b]"));
dialog.Ask(c => c.FilteredString, "Now you cant skip this filtered string!", new Regex("[a-b]"));
TestInput data = dialog.Run();

This will start a line-by-line dialog asking the user the questions specified. As you may have noticed there are mandatory questions with .Ask and optional with .AskOptional, where AskOptional accepts nullable types. For more information refer to the Documentation-Section

⚙ (simple) Loading Bar (& Waiting Bar)

Displays a classic progress bar, the loading bar takes a percentage value which it will be drawn to, while the waiting bar will just keep filling itself up till its stopped. This goes
well with the title screen and preloading ressources or checking stati before running the application.

A loading bar example

using (var bar = Loading.LoadingHelper.GetLoadingBar())
{
    for (short i = 0; i <= 100; i++)
    {
        bar.SetPercentage(i);
        //or perform a actually usefull task
        System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(50);
    }
    bar.Done();
}

A waiting bar example

using (var bar = Loading.LoadingHelper.GetWaitingBar())
{
    bar.Start();
    TimeConsumingStuff();
    bar.Done();
}

⚙ (simple) Title Screen

The title screen simply will center a supplied application name in a ascii box. Messages below the box can be supplied and it can be paired with a loading or waiting bar.

using (var title = TitleHelper.CreateTitlescreenFor("Superawsome Application!"))
{
    title.Show();
    Console.ReadKey();
    title.ChangeText("Pretty cool eh? Want to see a loading bar too? Press enter");
    Console.ReadKey();
    title.ChangeText("Here we go");
    using (var bar = Loading.LoadingHelper.GetLoadingBar())
    {
        bar.Start();
        title.ChangeText("Doing some important stuff");
        bar.SetPercentage(25);
        System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(50);
        title.ChangeText("Almost there ...");
        bar.SetPercentage(50);
        System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(500);
        bar.SetPercentage(80);
        title.ChangeText("Finishing up...");
        System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(800);
        bar.SetPercentage(100);
        title.ChangeText("...and we are ready to go!");
    }
    Console.ReadKey();
    title.Close();

}

⚙ Console Extensions

It also ships with a handfull of convenience utility functions, please refer to the documentation section below

Documentation

https://github.com/eisenwinter/konzolR/blob/master/README.md#-documentation

Release Notes

initial release

  • .NETFramework 4.5.2

    • No dependencies.

NuGet packages

This package is not used by any NuGet packages.

GitHub repositories

This package is not used by any popular GitHub repositories.

Version History

Version Downloads Last updated
0.1.0 610 2/23/2018